ArchiveJuly 2008

A Star of the Sea

Recipes
  1. When I first came to Shanagarry crabs were considered to be a nuisance by most fishermen because they found their way into the lobster pots and were much less lucrative to sell. Tommy Sliney, the legendary Ballycotton man who sold his fish from a donkey and cart on the pier occasionally brought us a few, and it was always a cause for celebration We’d prepare all the other ingredients and then my father-in-law, Ivan Allen, would mix and taste the Dressed Crab.    Serves 5-6 as a main course   15 ozs (425g) crab meat, brown and white mixed (2 or 3 crabs should yield this) 3 -3 1/2 ozs (75-95g) soft white breadcrumbs 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons tomato chutney or Ballymaloe Tomato Relish 1 oz (25g) butter generous pinch of dry mustard or 1 level teaspoon French mustard salt and freshly ground pepper 6 fl ozs (175ml) white sauce, see below   Topping 4 ozs (110g) buttered crumbs, see recipe below   Scrub the crab shells, mix all the ingredients except the buttered crumbs together, taste carefully and correct the seasoning. Fill into the shells and sprinkle with tops with the buttered crumbs.   Bake in a moderate oven 180C/350F/regulo 4, until heated through and brown on top (15-20 minutes approx.). Flash under the grill if necessary to crisp the crumbs.   Note: 1 lb (450g) cooked crab in the shell yields 6-8 ozs (170-225g) approx. crab meat depending on the time of the year.   White Sauce 1/2 pint (300ml) milk a few slices of carrot a few slices of onion a small sprig of thyme a small sprig of parsley 3 peppercorns 1 1/2 ozs (45g) roux, salt and freshly ground pepper  This is a marvelously way of making white sauce if you already have roux made. Put the cold milk into a saucepan with the carrot, onion, peppercorns, thyme and parsley. Bring to the boil, simmer for 4-5 minutes, remove from the heat and leave to infuse for ten minutes. Strain out the vegetables, bring the milk back to the boil and thicken with roux to a light coating consistency. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, taste and correct the seasoning if necessary. Buttered Crumbs 1 oz (25g) butter 2 ozs (50g)) soft white breadcrumbs  Next make the buttered crumbs. Melt the butter in a pan and stir in the breadcrumbs. Remove from the heat immediately and allow to cool.   Spicy Crab Cakes

The common brown crab is fortunately still abundant in Irish waters, its meat is sweet and succulent when freshly cooked and picked. Sadly not everyone tastes it like that.   The majority taste crab meat after it has been defrosted, the result is stringy, watery and lacking in flavour.
It comes as a surprise to some to hear that crabs contain not just white meat, but brown meat also.   The white meat comes from the claws, both large and small and there are also rich pickings in the leg sockets if you have a crab pick and a little patience.
The creamy brown meat comes from the body of the crab, it is rich and delicious and greatly contributes to the flavour of potted crab, dressed crab or crab mayonnaise.
At Ballymaloe House and the Cookery School we have always had a policy of buying whole crabs rather than crab claws which are unquestionably more popular.   This discourages the unscrupulous practice of pulling the large claws off and discarding the bodies, a practice which fishermen condemn themselves and deny exists.
In reality, crabs do become entangled in the nets and claws do occasionally get broken even when they are extracted with great care.   If a crab is thrown back into the sea with one large claw intact, it can feed itself and will grow another claw within a short time.  If both claws are missing, it simply starves to death.
When buying crab –

  1. Choose a crab with all the claws intact.
  2. It should feel heavy for its size
  3. Crabs, like other species can be male or female, the females are easy to recognize, they have a larger flap underneath.Female crabs generally contain more meat than males.   Crabs must be either alive or cooked when you buy them.  

   4.   Do not cook a dead crab.  When they die they become toxic quite quickly, its         impossible to tell the state of deterioration so do not take a risk.
 

Crabs are in season from April to September. Towards the end of the season the females tend to have an increased roe content in the body which is orangey red in colour.  This is of course edible but it is different in flavour and texture to the usual body meat.
Crab shells have lots of flavour so reboil with a fish stock to give a rich broth for a fish soup.
Here are some of my favourite crab recipes to entice you to experiment.
 How to Cook Crab
 Put the crab/s into a saucepan, cover with cold or barely lukewarm water, (use 6 ozs (175g) salt to every 2.3 litres (4 pints/10 cups water).  This sounds like an incredible amount of salt but try it: the crab will taste deliciously sweet.  Cover, bring to the boil and then simmer from there on, allowing 15 minutes for first 1 lb (450g), 10 minutes for the second and third (I’ve never come across a crab bigger than that!).  We usually pour off two-thirds of the water half way through cooking, cover and steam the crab for the remainder of the time.  As soon as it is cooked remove it from the saucepan and allow to get cold.
 
To extract the crab meat from the shell and claws:
First remove the large claws and the small claws ensuring that you tug them out of the socket with a juicy bit of white meat at the end.  Hold the crab with the underside uppermost and lever out the centre portion – I do this by catching the little lip of the projecting centre shell against the edge of the table and pressing down firmly.  The Dead Man’s Fingers (lungs) usually come out with this central piece, but check in case some are left in the body and if so remove them.
 Press your thumb down over the light shell just behind the eyes so that the shell cracks slightly, and then the sac which is underneath can be removed easily and discarded.   Everything else inside the body of the crab is edible.  The claws contain the white meat and the body has lots of brown creamy meat. The soft meat varies in colour from cream to coffee to dark tan, and towards the end of the season it can contain quite a bit of bright orange coral which is stronger in flavour.  Scoop it all out and put it into a bowl.  There will also be one or two teaspoonsful of soft meat in the centre portion attached to the small claws – add that to the bowl also.  Scrub the shell and keep it aside if you need it for dressed crab.
Holding this piece in the palm of your hand scrape the morsels of white meat out from the leg sockets, first downwards and then flip it over and do it upwards.  Put white meat into a bowl.
Crack the  large claws with a hammer or weight and extract every bit of white meat from them, poke out the meat from the small claws also, using a lobster pick, skewer or even the handle of a teaspoon.
 
Mix the brown and white meat together or use separately, depending on the recipe.
 Ivan Allen’s Dressed Crab
 

 

When I first came to Shanagarry crabs were considered to be a nuisance by most fishermen because they found their way into the lobster pots and were much less lucrative to sell. Tommy Sliney, the legendary Ballycotton man who sold his fish from a donkey and cart on the pier occasionally brought us a few, and it was always a cause for celebration We’d prepare all the other ingredients and then my father-in-law, Ivan Allen, would mix and taste the Dressed Crab.
  

Serves 5-6 as a main course
 

15 ozs (425g) crab meat, brown and white mixed (2 or 3 crabs should yield this)
3 -3 1/2 ozs (75-95g) soft white breadcrumbs
2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons tomato chutney or Ballymaloe Tomato Relish
1 oz (25g) butter
generous pinch of dry mustard or 1 level teaspoon French mustard
salt and freshly ground pepper
6 fl ozs (175ml) white sauce, see below
 

Topping

4 ozs (110g) buttered crumbs, see recipe below
 

Scrub the crab shells, mix all the ingredients except the buttered crumbs together, taste carefully and correct the seasoning. Fill into the shells and sprinkle with tops with the buttered crumbs.
 

Bake in a moderate oven 180C/350F/regulo 4, until heated through and brown on top (15-20 minutes approx.). Flash under the grill if necessary to crisp the crumbs.
 

Note: 1 lb (450g) cooked crab in the shell yields 6-8 ozs (170-225g) approx. crab meat depending on the time of the year.
 

White Sauce

1/2 pint (300ml) milk
a few slices of carrot
a few slices of onion
a small sprig of thyme
a small sprig of parsley
3 peppercorns
1 1/2 ozs (45g) roux,
salt and freshly ground pepper
 
This is a marvelously way of making white sauce if you already have roux made. Put the cold milk into a saucepan with the carrot, onion, peppercorns, thyme and parsley. Bring to the boil, simmer for 4-5 minutes, remove from the heat and leave to infuse for ten minutes. Strain out the vegetables, bring the milk back to the boil and thicken with roux to a light coating consistency. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, taste and correct the seasoning if necessary.

Buttered Crumbs

1 oz (25g) butter
2 ozs (50g)) soft white breadcrumbs
 
Next make the buttered crumbs. Melt the butter in a pan and stir in the breadcrumbs. Remove from the heat immediately and allow to cool.
 

Spicy Crab Cakes

75g (3oz) butter
4 tbsp white wine
4 cloves of garlic, crushed
450g (1 lb) crab meat
200g (7oz) white bread crumbs
1 egg, whisked
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
3 tbsp chopped coriander
6 spring onions, chopped
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1\2 tbsp Tabasco sauce
1\2 tbsp soy sauce
 
Seasoned flour
Beaten egg
breadcrumbs
 Melt the butter in a pan with the wine and garlic, add the crab meat and cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Season with salt and pepper. Combine all the other ingredients in a bowl, and add the crab meat. Shape into patties, dip in seasoned flour, beaten eggs and then in breadcrumbs. Then either deep fry, or pan fry in some olive oil.
 
Chunky Tomato Salsa
 200g (7ozs) (2 or 3) ripe tomatoes, cut into 2cm (¾ inch) chunks
1 spring onion, chopped, or 1 tablespoon chopped red onion
1 tablespoon chopped coriander
salt, pepper and a pinch of sugar
1 dessertspoon (approx) lime or lemon juice
 
Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and season to taste.
 
Crab Mayonnaise
 
Serves approx. 4-6
 Crab Mayonnaise is very versatile. It is delicious used as a filling for cucumber or tomato ring or as a stuffing for tomatoes. It also marries very well with a simple tomato salad for a first course for a dinner party.
We also serve Crab with Mayonnaise on brown bread at Ballymaloe House. This is simply a slice of buttered brown yeast bread with a lettuce leaf and a tablespoon of crab mayonnaise on top, garnished with watercress or parsley.
 
5 ozs (140g) crab meat, (mixed, white and brown crabmeat)
6-8 fl ozs (175-250ml) mayonnaise, (see recipe on website)
½ tsp. finely grated onion
Garnish: Small lettuce leaves or garden cress or watercress
 Mix the crab meat with 2-3 tbsp of mayonnaise and a little finely grated onion. Taste and season if necessary.
Note: Sometimes if the crab meat is quite strong tasting we add a little French dressing as well as the Mayonnaise. If the mixture is a little bland a pinch of mustard can bring up the flavour.
 
Stanley Mosse’s Potted Crab
 
Many years ago we dropped in to see our friends the Mosses in Bennettsbridge, Co. Kilkenny – well inland.   They had just cooked the box of crabs they had brought fresh up from the boats at Dunmore East in Co. Waterford.
We were given a great welcome: another pair of hands to extract the juicy white and brown meat.  Stanley Mosse then made up lots of this potted crab which we ate gluttonously on hot buttered toast.
 
Serves 8-10 as a starter
 5 ozs (140g) mixed brown and white cooked crab meat.
4 ozs (110g) softened butter
1-2 teaspoons finely chopped parsely
lemon juice to taste
 
Mix all ingredients together in a bowl or, better still, whizz them in a food processor.  Taste carefully and continue to season until you are happy with the flavour: it may need a little more lemon juice.   Press the mixture into a pottery bowl, cover and refrigerate.
 Rachel’s Crab and Prawn Coconut Soup
 
Serves 2
 This soup is delightfully rich and flavoursome but as it contains milk rather than cream it will not leave you feeling sluggish.
 
2 tbsp sunflower oil
2 small cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
½ tsp grated ginger
1 tsp lemon grass, finely chopped
200g (7oz) crab meat
500ml (18fl.oz) fish or light chicken stock
1 x 165g tin coconut milk
1 tbsp fish sauce (nam pla)
50g (2oz) raw prawns, peeled
2 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced
juice of  ½ lemon
¼ red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (leaves and stalks)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
 

 In a large saucepan on a medium heat, heat the oil, then add the garlic, ginger, lemon grass and crab meat.  Toss on the heat for a few minutes until light golden.  Add the stock, coconut milk and fish sauce.   Bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and add the prawns.   Cook for 1-2 minutes (simmering all the time) until the prawns are cooked.  Then add the spring onions, lemon juice, chilli and coriander, season to taste and serve.
 Hot Tips for July 26th
 SCHULL AGRICULTURAL SHOW – Sunday, 27th July, The Town Park, SchullThis is an unusual Show in that it has a very strong Food Connection – Ted Berner
and Fingal Ferguson of WILDSIDE CATERING will be there with Spits full of local pigs and lamb

The Farmer’s Market also will have all the local foods for sale and sampling – local horses,a fun dog show and also a Children’s Corner with a difference, very hands on and great fun for all the family!  Show Secretary Joe Ahern:  028 28707

Growing Awareness presents Permaculture Gardens Workshop with Graham Strouts – Sunday 27th July
At Derryduff, Coomhola, Bantry, Co Cork
Learn about the principles of Permaculture by making an ‘instant’ mulched garden, use perennials, and design a ‘forest garden’ including tree crops, fruit trees and bushes, perennial vegetables and other perennial plants. Cost €40 waged or €25 unwaged, Pre-booking essential – contact Graham on 086-8539900 or 027-66931or email graham@zone5.org 
Slow Food Ireland Terra Madre – WIT Waterford 4-7 September
www.terramadreireland.org
 ‘How to cure a pig in a day’ with Phillip Dennhardt at Ballymaloe Cookery School
On 16th September – now booking – Tel 021-4646785 www.cookingisfun.ie
 
 

Icing on the Cake

Claire Ptak had planned to move to London with her then boyfriend, an English chap named Damian, then she was offered a job as pastry chef at the famous Chez Panisse in Berkeley in California. This is any chef’s dream job, beautiful seasonal ingredients to work with and a passionate team of foodies to bounce ideas off. So she took the job and began a long-distance relationship.   

The desserts at Chez Panisse are not wild and fancy concoctions incorporating a trillion elements.  Instead they are simple fruit tarts, cake, fruit salads, fools and mousses that reflect the seasons and the produce of the local farmers and farmers market.  Alice Waters has been known to serve just one perfect peach in pristine condition from Frog Hollow Farm for pudding.

Claire finally married Damian and now lives in London where she has developed a cult following for her cup cakes.  She sells nine different varieties at her Violet Cakes stall at Hackney Farmers Market every Saturday morning

www.violetcakes.com 

There are perennial favourites like Vanilla Bean, Valrhona Chocolate  and Salted Caramel and her signature cup cakes with violet essence buttercream icing and decorated with crystallized violets.   At present she has added an elderflower cupcake, raspberry, strawberry and cherry and blackberry will soon follow.

Recently she came along to the school and enchanted the students with her beautiful cakes.

The melt-in-the-mouth pressed chocolate cake was decorated with fragments of gold leaf.  The tender little poppy seed cake was iced with elderflower icing and served with a green gooseberry compote.

Claire chose her favourite Devil’s Food cup cakes with marshmallow icing to share with the students. 

Oreo Cookies are the quintessential American cookies.  Claire made a delish home-made version and sandwiched them together with espresso and vanilla bean filling.

She also made two delish sandwiches – radish and sea salt and garlicky egg mayonnaise toasts –  so  so  good

.Next time you are in London at the weekend, why not pop out to Claire at Hackney Market and join the queue for her cup cakes.   Alternatively you could make your own or seek out Phillip Dennhardt’s Stolen Diamond stall at Mahon Farmers’ Market on Thursday or Midleton on Saturday.

Flourless Chocolate Cake with Gold Leaf and Chartreuse Cream and Chocolate Sauce

Serves 8-10
 
For the Cake:
100g (3 1/2 ozs) unsalted butter

120g (4ozs) dark chocolate, chopped into smallish chunks plus an extra chunk for decoration

3 organic free-range eggs, separated

100g (3 1/2 ozs) caster sugar

pinch salt

cocoa powder for dusting

real gold leaf for decoration, available from art supply shops (optional)

For the Chocolate Sauce:
100g (3 1/2 ozs) dark chocolate (at least 66% cocoa solids) eg Valrhona 70%
1 dessertsp. water

2 dessertsp. cocoa

1 dessertsp vanilla extract

For the Cream:
280ml (9 1/2fl ozs) double cream
6 teaspoons  caster sugar

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

3-6 teaspoons Chartreuse

1 x 16cm (6 1/4 inch) round and 6cm (2 1/2 inch) deep cake tinPreheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/Gas Mark 4 (no fan). Butter the sides of a 16cm (6 1/4 inch) round cake tin and place a round of baking parchment in the bottom.Place the butter and chocolate in a large heat-proof bowl over a bowl of just simmering water, making sure the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl, until just melted. Remove from the heat and let it rest in an area of the kitchen away from any draft, which will cause the chocolate to seize up.Place the yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer (or use a hand whisk) fitted with the whisk attachment. Whisk on medium speed for 1 minute then add half of the caster sugar (reserving the other half for the egg whites) and beat until light and fluffy. This will take a few minutes.Scrape the yolk and sugar mixture into the chocolate and fold together gently. It will be swirled, which is what you want. Don’t be tempted to over-mix at this stage.In a clean, dry bowl, start whisking the egg whites in the same manner as above. Once the sugar has been added, whip up to almost stiff peaks. This will also take a few minutes. Fold this into the chocolate mixture and transfer to the prepared cake tin.Bake in the centre of the oven for 30-35 minutes, or until the top of the cakes rises up, cracks slightly, and feels firm to the touch yet with a wobble. The skewer test does not work with this cake, because it wants to be quite wet inside when it is done. Over baking it will only dry it out. Let cool in the tin. The cake will sink quite a lot, which is what you want. Run a knife around the edge and place a plate on top of the cake before inverting it. Remove the tin and peel back the parchment paper before placing the cake on your desired cake stand or serving dish. Turn the kettle on and boil some water. Place your extra little piece of chocolate in a ramekin or small heat-proof dish. Fill a slightly bigger bowl with about 2 cm (3/4 inch) of boiling water and place the dish with the chocolate inside that. This is an easy way to melt a small amount of chocolate without burning it. Dust the cake with a little cocoa powder, scoop the melted chocolate into a little button on the top of the cake and let it cool and firm up. Take a piece of gold leaf the same size as your drop of chocolate and rub onto it or delicately lift it off of its paper and place on the chocolate. Use an art brush or pastry brush.For the Chocolate sauce:
Melt the chocolate in a heat-proof bowl over simmering water.
Whisk in the cocoa, water and vanilla.

For the Chartreuse Cream:
Lightly whisk the cream and add all the other ingredients. Stop whisking before you think it is done, as it will get a little thicker as it sits.  Keep soft.
To ServeDrizzle a little sauce and place a piece of cake on top of that and add a dollop of cream alongside.

Poppyseed Cake with Elderflower Icing and Gooseberry Compote

Serves 6Preparation Time: 25 minutes plus 35-40 minutes baking time, cooling time, and 10 minutes decorating time.For the cake:
165g (6ozs) unsalted butter, softened
110g (4ozs) caster sugar

zest of 1 lemon, (juice reserved for the icing, if making lemon icing, leave lemon out if using elderflower cordial in the icing)

25g (1oz) poppyseeds

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 teaspoon orange blossom water

200g (7ozs) self-raising flour

140ml (5fl ozs) milk

3 organic free-range egg whites

For the icing:
125g (4 1/2ozs) icing sugar
9-12 teaspoons elderflower cordial

10g (1/2 oz) poppyseeds

elderflower blossoms to decorate

For the Compote:
300g (11ozs) gooseberries, topped and tailed
sugar to taste (maybe 100g)

80ml (3fl ozs) Elderflower cordial

1 elderflower head

1 x 16cm (6 1/4 inch) round and 6cm (2 1/2 inch) deep cake tinPreheat the oven to 160°C/320°F/Gas Mark 2 1/2 (no fan). Butter the sides of a 16cm (6 1/4 inch) round cake tin and place a round of baking parchment in the bottom.Place the softened butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment and beat on medium for at least 5 minutes until pale and fluffy and nearly doubled in size. If you don’t have a mixer, use a wooden spoon and a lot of elbow grease.Add the poppyseeds, lemon zest, vanilla extract and orange blossom water and mix through. Add half of the flour and mix, alternating with half the milk until all is incorporated. Take off the mixer and transfer to another large bowl.Clean and dry the mixing bowl, change to the whisk attachment, and whisk the egg whites to soft peaks. It should be quite loose, so underwhip, rather than overwhip. Alternatively use a hand whisk. Just be sure the bowl you use is free from any grease or oil residue, or your whites will not whip up. Stir in 1/3 of the egg whites to lighten the batter, then fold in the remaining whites. Transfer to your prepared tin.Bake in the centre of the oven for 60 minutes, until firm to the touch and a skewer inserted comes out clean. Cool in the tin. Meanwhile, make the gooseberry compote by washing the berries, putting them into a small saucepan with a little water so that they don’t scorch, and the sugar. Cook over moderate heat and bruise them up with a wooden spoon when they are soft enough. Add the cordial and trim the blossoms from the head of Elderflower and stir it all together and let cool.  Add a little more cordial if necessary and taste for sweetness, add more sugar if necessary.Run a knife around the edge and place a plate on top of the cake before inverting it. Remove the tin and peel back the parchment paper before placing the cake on your desired cake stand or serving dish. Whisk together the icing sugar and freshly squeezed lemon juice to form a thick paste. Spoon onto the cake and using the back of the spoon, push the icing to the edges, coaxing it to drip down the sides. Sprinkle with poppyseeds and a few elderflower blossoms and serve with the compote.Devil’s Food Cupcakes with Fluffy Marshmallow Icing
 For the cupcakes:
220g (8ozs) self-raising flour
125g (4 1/2 ozs) cocoa powder
1 teaspoon salt

2 1/4 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

450g (1lb) caster sugar

4 free-range eggs

2 1/4 teaspoons vanilla extract

350ml (12fl ozs) buttermilk (or if you don’t have that, semi-skimmed milk and a 3 teaspoons lemon juice

140g (5ozs) melted unsalted butter

100ml (3 1/2fl ozs) brewed espresso or strong coffee

100ml (3 1/2fl ozs) water

For the Icing:
3 free-range egg whites
450g (1lb) icing sugar

120ml (4fl ozs) water

4-5 teaspoons  golden syrup (can be used instead of corn syrup)

pinch salt

4 teaspoons  vanilla extract

1 vanilla bean

Decoration
candied flowers to decorate, rose petals, violets or Johnny jump ups.
Cupcake tinsPaper cases

For the cupcakes, sift together the flour, cocoa, salt and bicarbonate and set aside.Whisk together the sugar, eggs, vanilla, and buttermilk.  Mixture will be very runny.Add the melted butter first to the measured out coffee and water, and then into the egg and buttermilk mixture. This will help to avoid the melted butter going into hard lumps when it hits the cold buttermilk. Whisk all together and sift in the dry and whisk again to incorporate fully.Pour the mixture into a small jug, a few cups at a time and use the jug to pour the mixture into your prepared cupcake tins.  Fill half way up.Bake at 150°C/300°F/Gas Mark 2 until springy and firm. About 10 minutes for mini cakes and 15-20 for standard cupcakes.For the Icing:
In a heatproof (pyrex)  bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients and place over a saucepan of boiling water (do not let the water touch the bottom of the bowl or it will cook the egg whites). Heat until hot to the touch, remove and beat with an electric mixer until stiff.
Put the icing into a piping bag with a large round tip and pipe large blobs onto cooled cupcakes. Decorate with candied flowersChocolate Wafer Cookies
 These are like Oreo cookies
 
Makes 6 logs – this is for a big quantity – you can scale it down yourself if you like
– icing quantities would need to be adjusted also.
  Ingredients
 12ozs (350g) butter
1lb 2ozs (500g) caster sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 free-range organic eggs
5ozs (150g) cocoa powder

13ozs (375g) plain flour

2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

Vanilla Icing
 
2 1/2 fl ozs (65ml) milk

4ozs (110g) unsalted butter

1lbs 1ozs (475g) icing sugar

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 scraped vanilla bean

Violet Icing
 
7fl ozs (200ml) milk

13ozs (375g) unsalted butter

 3lbs 5ozs – 4 1/2lbs (1.5kg – 2kg) icing sugar

6 teaspoons violet essence

Expresso Icing
 
3 3/4 fl ozs (112ml) cold coffee

1 1/4 fl ozs (38ml) milk

10ozs (280g) butter

1.5kg (3lbs 5ozs) icing sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons Armagnac brandy

2 1/4 teaspoons fresh coffee grounds

2 1/4 teaspoons vanilla extract

First make the logs.
Cream together the butter and the sugar together very well.  Add the vanilla extract and eggs.  Sift together the cocoa powder, flour, baking powder and salt.  Roll into logs and freeze.
Slice the log into 1/2cm (1/4 inch) thick and bake at 170°C/325°F/Gas Mark 3 for 8-10 minutes – let cool on parchment paper.For the icing.
Cream the butter and half the icing sugar.  Add the liquid.  Then cream in the rest of the icing sugar on a low speed – about 3 minutes until creamy.
Pipe a blob of icing in the centre of one biscuit, then press another on top so you can just see the icing coming through.Foolproof Food

Butter and Radish Sandwiches with Sea Salt

Very much like cucumber sandwiches, but with that little bite that radishes have. If you can get really fresh bunches from your farmer’s market with dark green stems intact, use the greens in your sandwiches as well. When they are young, the greens have a wonderful flavour of their own.Serves 6-8Preparation Time: 10 minutes2-3 bunches of the freshest baby radishes you can findfresh unsalted butter, softened

sea salt, such as Maldon

small loaf of sliced white bread

Undo the radish bunches, put them in a bowl and cover with cold water. The sandy dirt will sink to the bottom and the cold water perks up the leaves if you are using them. Set aside.Lay out your slices of bread and spread a nice even layer of butter on each.Remove the radishes from the water and pat dry with kitchen towel. Cut off the greens and either set aside or discard. Slice the radishes into thin discs.Arrange the radishes, slightly overlapping on half of the bread slices. Sprinkle with salt. Lay a couple of green leaves on each slice (if using), then place the remaining buttered slices of bread on top to form the sandwiches.Cut the crusts off with a serrated knife and cut each sandwich into three strips. Serve Immediately.Hot Tips
 L’Atmosphere Restaurant, 19 Henrietta St. Waterford. Tel 051-858426
Arnaud, Mary and Patrice Garreau run this great little French restaurant – delicious keenly priced food – like eating in a good French bistro – early bird menu, daily specials, a  la carte, good French breads – Arnaud runs his own French bakery – delicious desserts – friendly service and children welcome. 
Cooking Classes with Rory O’Connell at Snugboro, Ballycotton, Co Cork, now booking for the autumn
A day of cooking and gardening, 12 & 13th September, Autumn Cooking, 16th October
– special courses also arranged – www.rgoconnell.com rory@rgoconnell.com
Tel 086-8516917
 
Midleton and Area Chamber
present an  Exclusive Midsummer Party at Capella Resort and Spa, Castlemartyr

Sunday July 27th, 5pm till late

A 5 star evening not to be missed!  Sumptuous BBQ and fine wines. Renowned 10 piece band, Brass & Co. & much more fun and entertainment.  Special accommodation rates also available.  Tickets available through Chamber office 021-4613483

 

 

Cooks Share Skills

 Food crosses every border. We all have to eat so when we cook and share together, a special bond is formed.

The influx of immigrants from the Eastern European countries during the past five or six years has greatly enhanced our economy and enriched our culture.

At Ballymaloe we have some wonderful Polish, Lithuanian, Czech , Croatian and Russian staff working with us.   Each has their own traditions and indigenous foods and most importantly cooking skills.

I once asked a lovely lady from Lithuania who applied for a job, if she could cook, she was completely baffled by the question – “Of course I can cook, everyone cooks, one has to be able to cook to survive.” How true.

Recently the East Cork Slow Food Convivium created an event around Eastern European Food so we could learn more about it.

We had three cooks, Julija Makejeva who has worked with us here at the Ballymaloe Cookery School for the past three years.

Kate Zalesski from Poland, whom I met a few weeks ago at the open day on Jenny and Peter Young’s farm, lives near Naas, Co Kildare and cooks a wide variety of vegetarian food which she sells at the Naas Farmers Market, Kate operates under the name of Green Harvest.

Katrina Kollegaeva from Estonia was with us for few weeks working in the gardens.

Kate cooked the famous Beetroot Soup – Borscht –, Potato and Cheese Pierogi, Blueberry Buns and Kulebiak, a Cabbage and Mushroom Pastry garland.
Then Julija rolled up her sleeves and made Tsepeliny (Lithuanian national dish).  First she grated the potato, then squeezed out the liquid and saved the starch as though she was making boxty.  This was mixed with the potato and wrapped around a tasty mince mixture.   These were poached for 40-45 minutes and then served with a sauce of sour cream and bacon.
Julija’s husband and her little boy Denis came to watch and he told me how proud he was of his Mama.

Kate’s husband Ralf also drove her down from Naas and their daughter Anya came too, she was dressed up in her best spotted apron and the cutest shoes, ready to help her Mum to fill the pierogi and spoon fresh blueberry purée into the buns.  It was a delight to see the traditional cooking skills being passed from mother to daughter.

Russian Salad, which is what Julija calls Vinigret, was next and I’m delighted to report that it was quite unlike any Russian salad I’ve ever eaten before.  Julija’s version is tossed in a light dressing rather than lots of globby mayonnaise – deliciously light and moreish.

Oladushki, or fluffy pancakes have already been absorbed into our repertoire.  The batter is made in minutes, spoonfuls are cooked in a little sizzling butter on a frying pan until the bubbles burst on one side, then they are flipped over until golden on the other side.   They are served with a choice of three toppings – sour cream mixed with raspberry jam, or sour cream mixed with soft brown sugar or honey.  They are Denis’s favourite breakfast, they were easy and so delicious – so do try them.

It was a wonderful convivial event where the audience participated in filling the pierogi and blueberry muffins and everyone tucked in at the end.

Foolproof food
Beetroot Soup ( BORSCHT )
 
Serves 6
 6 medium beetroots, peeled and cut into small cubes
3 carrots, chopped2 sticks celery, chopped2 large cabbage leaves, cut roughly and chopped 1 onion, chopped2 or 3 bay leaves6 cups (2 pints/1.2L) vegetable or chicken broth

5 medium -sized potatoes, peeled and cut into cubes 

freshly squeezed lemon juice

freshly ground black pepper

sugar

1 cup (8fl.oz/225ml) sour creamfresh dill for garnishCook the chopped onion in a little oil until lightly browned.Place the beetroot, carrot, celery, cabbage, onion and bay leaves into a pan, cover with broth. Add salt and cook until vegetables are tender –  about an hour.Meanwhile boil the potatoes in salted water, until tender. Strain off the liquid.  Set aside.When the beets are soft add lemon juice,salt ,pepper, sugar.Ladle the soup over the potatoes.Dollop with a generous spoon of sour cream, garnish with the snipped dill.Kulebiak – Cabbage and Mushroom Pastry
 
Serves 5
 Delicious eaten with Borscht.  Dough:
1 kg (2¼lb) plain flour
375 g (13oz) butter100g (3½ oz) fresh yeast3 Tbs sugarpinch of salt250-300 ml (9-10fl.oz) sour cream.

Stuffing:2 lb (900g) white cabbagefew dried wild mushrooms1 onion, chopped4 tbsp sunflower oilsalt and freshly ground pepper

Rinse and cook the mushrooms, and cut into small cubes.  Shred cabbage, add cubed mushrooms and chopped onion, oil and a little mushroom stock and cook until tender on a low heat flame, for about 20 minutes. Steam off liquid at end. Add salt and pepper to taste. Let it cool.First make the dough. Mix the yeast with sugar. Cut butter into flour, add sour cream, yeast mixture and salt and knead into dough.  It should be firm enough to be rolled out. Cover and allow to rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.Sprinkle some flour on a board. Roll the dough out into a rectangular piece, about 5mm (¼ in) thick. Spread the cooled cabbage mixture along the edge of dough and roll into a swiss roll. Place the dough on a greased baking tray in a circle, brush with milk, cut half way into the dough every few inches.  Cover, allow to rise, and when it has doubled in size, bake in a preheated oven at 180C/350F/gas 4 for 35-45 minutes.These are great hot or cold.Oladushki (Russian Fluffy Pancakes) with Sour Cream and Raspberry Jam
Serves 4
160g (5 1/2 ozs/scant 1 1/2 cups) white flour
225 ml (8fl ozs/1 cup) buttermilk
2 free-range organic eggs
1/2 teaspoon breadsoda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon vegetable oil, for pan frying
 First, measure the buttermilk into a small bowl and sprinkle the baking soda on top and leave for 3 to 4 minutes to allow the mixture bubble.   Whisk the egg, salt, and sugar into the buttermilk mixture.   Next, slowly add the flour to the batter by whisking until mixture appears to have an even consistency, set aside. 
Heat a frying pan on a medium high heat. Add a little vegetable oil. Fill the pan with 5-6 tablespoonfuls of batter spaced evenly apart. Fry until golden brown, flip once bubbles have appeared on the surface and popped. Repeat frying process until all of the batter is used. Serve with dips (see below).
 
Serving SuggestionsMake several dips by mixing sour cream with raspberry jam 50/50; sour cream with brown sugar, and honey. Tsepeliny (Lithuanian national dish)
  Serves 3-5
 1.5-2 litre (2½ -3½ pints) of salted boiling water             3 large potatoes
            
             1 onion, grated              Salt and freshly ground pepper             200 g (7oz) minced pork            1 onion, finely chopped

1 egg

Sauce:
125 g (4½ oz) smoked streaky bacon, cut into lardons

125 g (4½ oz) sour cream

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Garnish:
Snipped parsley

Muslin clothBring the water to the boil in a large saucepan.Peel the potatoes. Finely grate them together with 1 onion. Put the potatoes and the onion into the muslin cloth, and squeeze the excess liquid out into a bowl. Then, carefully pour the liquid into a smaller bowl, so that the starch left at the bottom of the first bowl stays at the bottom of the bowl. Take half of the starch left behind and mix it into the boiling water so that there are no lumps.Make the filling by mixing the mincemeat with 1 beaten egg, 1 chopped onion, and salt and pepper. Set aside.Next, add the remaining half of the starch to the bowl of potato/onion mixture. Mix it well, divide it into 3-5 equal portions. Take one portion and put it into your palm, flatten so it is approx. 1 centimeter high; put a tablespoon of the mincemeat mixture into the centre and seal the potato mixture around it.  Slip the tsepeliny into simmering water and cook uncovered for 40-45 minutes.Just before the tsepeliny are ready, fry the bacon lardons in a frying pan until they release the fat and are crispy.  Add the sour cream and let it simmer for a few minutes.

Serve tsepeliny per person, topped with the sour cream/bacon sauce.

Scatter with freshly snipped parsley

Blueberry Buns
 500g/1lb 2oz strong flour2 tsp dried yeast
2 tbsp melted butter12 fl.oz (350ml/1 1/2 cups) warm milk2 tbsp sour cream4 tbsp sugarVanilla extract

200g (7oz) blueberries4oz (110g/½ cup) sugar1 glass 3½ – 4 inches in diameter for cutting dough.Prime the yeast in warm water. Leave for 5 minutes, until dissolved. Mix with flour. Add sugar, sour cream, milk and vanilla. Knead until smooth, add melted butter and knead until absorbed and the dough is shiny and elastic, about 10 minutes. Put the dough in a bowl, cover with tea towel and let it rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.Meanwhile put the blueberries and sugar into a saucepan and cook them for about 20 minutes to make jam.When the dough is ready divide it into two parts, roll them out on floured surface. Cut out the circles with a glass. Place a teaspoon of jam in the center and cover with another dough circle. Seal the edges .Let the buns to rise for 20 min. Brush with milk and bake in a preheated oven at 180C/350F/gas4, for 20-25 minutes.Dust with icing sugar. These are lovely while still warm with milky coffee.Hot Tips
 
Asian Kitchens – another addition to Cork’s culinary scene –
Unit 6&7, Camden Wharf, Carroll’s Quay, Cork, tel 087 902 3068
Wonderful Asian cook Wasinee Beech and her husband Len have just opened their new Asian food shop, so for authentic ingredients pay them a visit. 
  The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) has announced a national food labelling public consultation calling on Irish consumers and interested parties to express their views and opinions on food labelling.  This process is in light of an EU proposal to amend labelling regulations, which will ultimately ensure greater food safety protection by allowing consumers to make informed decisions on food purchases.  The public is urged to visit www.fsai.ie to communicate its views on all food labelling issues that are of interest to them.  The consultation phase will run for over two months and the closing date for responses is 19th September 2008.  All comments will be considered in the FSAI submission to the Department of Health and Children and will form the structure of Ireland’s national policy on food labelling
 Slow Food East Cork
Learn how to prepare, cook and extract meat from Ballycotton Crabs with Darina Allen on Tuesday 15th July 2008 at 7.30pm at Ballymaloe Cookery School –
Dressed Crab, Crab Mayonnaise, Spicy Crab Cakes, Potted Crab ….
€30 for Slow Food Members, €40 for non-Members – booking essential Tel 021-4646785
slowfood@cookingisfun.ieIghtermurragh Allotments, Ladysbridge, Co Cork
Allotment Gardening Information Day – Saturday 19th July 2-5pm
Guest speaker Michael Brenock – view progress and discuss future plans – allotment holders will talk about their experience and new prospective holders very welcome.
Tel 021-4667330   086-3003810  
   

   

 

The Four Seasons Cookery Book

A tome that is unanimously heralded as a timeless classic has been republished by Grub Street Publishers.  The first edition was my most treasured Christmas present in 1970 and by now it has lost its cover and is deliciously dog-eared.  

The latest edition has a brand new contemporary look and a foreword by Delia Smith, one of Margaret Costa’s fans.   There are a myriad of others including Myrtle Allen, Nigel Slater, Simon Hopkinson……..

This book has stood the test of time as we have come full circle in our attitude to food.  Its no longer a novelty to eat strawberries year round and its fast becoming naff and politically uncool to fill our shopping trolleys with exotic foods from across the globe, which rarely taste or nourish like fresh local food of our own country.

Margaret Costa was well ahead of her time when almost 40 years ago, she organized her book, not in the familiar starters, main courses and puds format, but according to the seasons. Good things to cook and eat in Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter.  Within each section there were, and still are also themed chapters such as Comforting Breakfasts, Rhubarb and Green Gooseberries, Olives, Proper Puddings, Pieces of Cake …

Margaret Costa broke away from the French influenced Cordon Bleu style and wrote recipes in simple English, everyone could understand what she was writing about and this in turn gave people confidence in the kitchen and encouraged them to try her beautifully crafted recipes.   She also gives the reader many inspiring variations, hints and suggestions.

The Four Seasons Cookery Book is one of my all-time favourites and a must for the growing number of people who care about eating well by using fresh foods in season and about feeding families with good food which is neither elaborate nor time consuming.  Here are some recipes from the book.

Margaret Costa’s Four Seasons Cookery Book published by Grub Street.
 Spiced Mackerel   – Four Seasons Cookbook by Margaret Costa
 6 mackerel1 teasp (5ml) black peppercorns

3 bay leaves

2 good teasp (10ml) salt

3 medium-sized onions

1oz (25g) butter

3 tablesp (45ml) cider

¾ pint (425ml) cider or tarragon vinegar

3 tablesp (45ml) sultanas (optional)

2 good teasp (10ml) sugar

Pinch of cayenne

Clean the mackerel and lay them in a pan with the peppercorns and bay leaves; pour over them enough salted water just to cover.   Simmer very gently for about 10 minutes; if you let them boil their skins will burst.   When cooked, drain well, reserving the cooking liquid, and lay in a shallow dish.

Cut the onions into thin slices, cook them until soft in the butter, drain them and spread them over the mackerel.   Boil up the cider with the vinegar and ½ pint (300ml) of the liquid in which the fish were poached and add the peppecorns and bay leaves, the sultanas, sugar and pinch of cayenne.

Pour over the mackerel.   Cover and keep for at least a day or two before serving; it will, of course, keep for much longer.  Serve it with a salad and hot or cold new potatoes.

On a cold summer day serve hot grilled mackerel with new potatoes.  Score the mackerel before grilling with deep diagonal slashes on each side and fill these cuts with strong yellow Dijon mustard.  Oil the fish well before grilling and ‘refresh’ the mustard before serving if you like.

Peaches with Sour Cream
 8oz (225g) vanilla sugar
½ pint (300ml) water

1 peach for each person

Caster sugar

Soured cream

Demerara sugar or toasted flaked almonds

Dissolve the sugar in the water and simmer for 5 minutes.  Poach the peaches very lightly in this syrup, then skin them and slice them into a bowl, sprinkling each layer with a very little caster sugar.  Cover thickly with soured cream and sprinkle thickly with Demerara sugar or toasted flaked almonds before serving.

Crab Omelette
 1½ oz (40g) crabmeat – mixed brown and white – per person1½ eggs per person

½ teasp (2.5ml) cold water per person

A little butter

Mix the white and brown meat of the crab thoroughly together and stir in the beaten eggs.   Season well and add the cold water.   Heat the butter in the frying pan; when it is really hot, pour in the egg and crab mixture, and make the omelette in the usual way.  It is delicious when served with a simple green salad

Avgolemono
This makes a ravishing summer soup.  Make it when you’ve boiled a chicken.  You need really good stock for it, flavoured with onion and fresh herbs and well seasoned.
2 pints (1.2 litres) chicken stock

4 eggs

The juice of 1 large lemon

Thin slices of lemon and sprigs of dill to garnish

Bring the chicken stock to the boil.  Beat the eggs in a bowl with the lemon juice. Gradually add a little of the stock to the eggs, beating well.   Return to the pan and cook until it is the consistency of thin custard – but be careful not to let it get anywhere near boiling point.  You can serve it hot or chilled.  Hot it tastes more chickeny; cold, more lemony.  Either way, float a thin slice of lemon in the bowl, and top it, if you can, with a feathery sprig of dill.  Two ounces (55g) of rice can be simmered in the stock if you like, but if you use rice do remember to allow a little more stock as it will become reduced while the rice is cooking.

Liver with Dubonnet and Orange
 1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil
1½ oz (40g) butter

2 small onions

1 clove garlic

1lb (450g) calf’s or lamb’s liver

Seasoned flour

1 tablespoon (15ml) orange juice

8 tablespoons (120ml) Dubonnet (red)

2 good tablespoons (50ml) finely chopped parsley

Coarsely grated rind of 1 large orange

1 teaspoon (5ml) finely grated lemon rind

As many rashers of back bacon as you wish

Heat the olive oil and butter together very gently in a large, deep frying pan and cook the very finely chopped onions and crushed garlic in it over a very low heat, covered, until the onions are soft and just beginning to colour.   Cut the slices of liver very evenly about ½ inch (10mm) thick, and coat with seasoned flour – flour to which you have added a good saltspoon (1.25ml) of salt and some freshly ground black pepper. When the onions are cooked, add the slices of liver to the pan in one layer and continue to cook over a very moderate heat.  As soon as you see ‘the blood rise in it’ – a vivid chef’s phrase – turn the liver over and cook for a slightly shorter time at an even lower heat.  (The cooking time will obviously depend on the thickness of the liver as well as on personal taste – but don’t overcook it.)  Remove the slices to a warmed plate and cover them with as much of the chopped onion as you can remove with a perforated spoon.

Now add the orange juice and the Dubonnet to the juices left in the pan, scraping the bottom of the pan with a rubber spatula or a wooden spoon.  Bring to the boil and boil rapidly for a couple of minutes until the ‘sauce’ has reduced by almost half.   Turn off the heat, add the parsley, orange rind and lemon rind (keeping some of the parsley and orange rind to use as a garnish) and give it a final stir.   Pour over the liver and serve with – or without, it is delicious either way – the grilled bacon rashers and with mashed potato, grilled tomatoes and, if you like, mushrooms.  Scatter the rest of the parsley and the rest of the orange rind over the liver just before serving.

Treacle Sponge
 This is really a Winter pudding but one of the classics from the book.
2 tablespoons (30ml) golden syrup

The juice of ½ lemon

1 tablespoon (15ml) fine breadcrumbs

Butter

Grated rind of 1 lemon

4oz (115g) caster sugar

2 eggs

5oz (140g) self-raising flour

Pinch of salt

Milk

Mix together the syrup, lemon juice and breadcrumbs, and put them at the bottom of a buttered pudding basin.  Cream 4oz (115g) butter with the finely grated lemon rind and the sugar until fluffy, and add the beaten eggs.  Stir in the flour, sifted with a pinch of salt, and add just enough milk for the batter to drop from a spoon.    Turn into the pudding basin, cover and steam for 2 hours.  Serve with more syrup, warmed and sharpened with lemon juice.

Foolproof Food
Summer Pasta with Zucchini, Sugar Snaps and Peas
 
This is one of our favourite summer recipes when we have our own freshly picked zucchini and sugar peas –
Serves 10 approx.
 

450g (1lb) Penne
450g (1lb) green and golden zucchini, 5-6 inches in length
110g (4oz) peas, cooked
450g (1 lb) sugar snaps
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon chilli flakes, optional
50g (2oz) butter
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley
50g (2oz) fresh basil leaves or marjoram, chopped
 

A few zucchini blossoms, if available
 

Top and tail the zucchini and cut into 5mm (1/4 inch) thick slices at an angle.  String the sugar snaps if necessary.  Bring  8 litres (12 pints) of water to the boil in a large deep saucepan, add 2 tablespoons salt, add the pasta and cook until al dente.  Meanwhile shoot the sugar snaps into 1.2 litres (2 pints) of boiling water with 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt and cook uncovered for 3-4 minutes or until crisp and al dente.  Drain and refresh under cold water.  Save the water and bring to the boil again.  Add the peas and cook for a few minutes. If you’re adept at juggling and have enough stove space you can also cook the zucchini while the pasta and sugar snaps are cooking.
 

Heat the butter and olive oil in a sauté pan.  Add the chilli flakes, if using, toss in the zucchini, increase the heat and continue to toss for 3 or 4 minutes, season with salt and freshly ground pepper, cover and reduce heat to medium for another few minutes by which time the zucchini should be tender but still al dente; Draw off the heat and allow to cool. By now if you’re timing is good the pasta should be al dente so drain it quickly. Add the sugar snaps, peas, zucchini, chopped parsley and the torn basil or chopped marjoram to the pasta.  Toss well with a little extra virgin olive oil.  Taste, correct seasoning if necessary. Turn into a pasta bowl, sprinkle a few zucchini blossoms and basil leaves over the top

Hot tips
 Congratulations to the Tesco Young Chefs of the Year
Senior winner was Laura Clifford from Co Louth – following in the footsteps of her brother who won the competition two years ago and is now training to be a professional chef at Dundalk IT – children of the highly regarded chef the late Michael Clifford of Cliffords in Cork.  Laura presented a Nettle Soup with Brown Bread, Baked cod, courgettes and Parmesan cheese with potato cakes.   Junior winner was Donncha MacBride also from Co Louth.   Donncha served Annagassen crab salad with a spicy tomato and red pepper coulis and avocado guacamole, Irish Pork Wellington with sage and onion stuffing, finely shredded spring cabbage and bacon and a Bramley apple, honey and vanilla sauce
Festival Time
Check out www.discoverireland.ie for list of the many festivals taking place around the country this summer.
Xpresso Café at Arcade, Midleton, Co Cork
Touring East Cork, having an outing to Midleton, coffee after the Farmers Market,  or just popping in for some shopping –   the Arcade is the perfect one stop shop for morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea – all coffee and chocolate is organic and fair-trade, smoothies made with probiotic yogurt, homemade scones, cakes, soup, bagels, toasted sandwiches, paninis… alongside a wide range of fashions for all ages, also interiors and gifts – arcademidleton@eircom.net   021-4631077

Lullaby Milk from Ardrahan
High in Melatonin from cows milked before daybreak – Ardrahan Lullaby Milk is suitable for both young and old with sleeping problems, even helps some people with jet lag. From the Friesian herd of Mary and Gerald Burns who also make the wonderful Ardrahan Cheese – Lullaby Milk, pasteurised and non-homogenised – can be drank as it is or add crushed summer fruits. Available at Dunnes Stores, Super-Valu, and Spar on McCurtain St., Cork – www.ardrahan.ie  Tel 029-78099

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